When at first you don’t succeed, seek post-verdict decertification: Lessons learned from Mazzei v. The Money Store

What do you do when a court certifies a class over your objection and denies your motion for directed verdict on the critical class certification issue at trial, and a jury awards $32 million ($54 million if you count pre-judgment interest) on an individual claim worth $133.80? This was the situation the defendants faced in Mazzei v. The Money Store. What happened defied all odds. Read more >> 

Banking Industry, Mortgage Lending Industry, Pre-Certification Motions, U.S. Supreme Court

New life for the death knell? SCOTUS accepts Microsoft Corp. v. Baker

On January 15, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari to review the decision of the Ninth Circuit in Baker v. Microsoft Corporation. The question presented is: “Whether a federal court of appeals has jurisdiction under both Article III and 28 U.S.C. § 1291 to review an order denying class certification after the named plaintiffs voluntarily dismiss their claims with prejudice.” Read more >>

Class Definitions, Federal Class Action Law, U.S. Supreme Court

No good deed goes unpunished: Did P.F. Chang’s prompt notice of data breach create standing to sue?

On April 14, the court released its opinion in Lewert v. P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, Inc., holding that class plaintiffs may satisfy Article III standing by alleging both an increased risk of fraudulent charges and identity theft, as well as costs incurred in mitigating a future risk of harm. Although this is the second time the Seventh Circuit has addressed standing in this context, the case expands the court’s already generous standard. It also illustrates the difficult choices faced by companies whose systems are hacked. Read more >>

Class Definitions, Data Privacy and Cyber Security, U.S. Supreme Court